Airspeed As.51 Horsa

Combat Glider

In 1948 the Belgian Army was planning to provide the Para-commando units with Horsa combat gliders. For this purpose an order for six Horsa's was placed with Airspeed in January 1949. Unfortunately, even after delivery of the first aircraft, the Belgian Government refused to grant permission to operate heavy gliders over Belgian territory. The sole Horsa delivered to the Belgian Army was transported to Schaffen where at first it was used for ground training but finally ended up as a gate-guardian. Unfortunately the wooden machine suffered from the humid weather conditions and was scrapped by the end of the fifties or early sixties. 

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

RX763

-

May 1951

1960

X763 (RAF), Ground training Schaffen, Gate Guardian Schaffen, Broken up

 

De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito T/TT.3

Twin-engined target-towing and multi-engine trainer

Seven De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito T/TT.3’s as well as a single instructional airframe of this type saw service with the Belgian Air Force. At first used as "multi-engine trainers" at the advanced flying training school at Brustem, the Mosquito T/TT.3's were soon replaced by the Oxford and moved on to the JVS/EC (fighter training school) at Koksijde where they relieved the Miles Martinet in the target-tug role. A single aircraft (MA-7) was used by N° 10 Mosquito NF.30 Squadron as trainer/communications aircraft to spare airframe time on the war weary NF.30's.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

MA-1

-

Jul 1947

Apr 1954

VR333 (RAF), MA-1/B2-A

MA-2

-

Jul 1947

Nov 1954

VR335 (RAF), MA-2/B2-B

MA-3

-

Aug 1947

Jun 1955

VR338 (RAF), MA-3/B2-C

MA-4

-

Oct 1947

Sep 1955

VR339 (RAF), MA4/B2-B > B2-D, Crash at Koksijde 07 Sep 1955

MA-5

-

Feb 1948

Jun 1955

VR341 (RAF), MA-5/B2-E

MA-6

-

Feb 1948

Jun 1955

VR342 (RAF), MA-6/B2-F

MA-7

-

Feb 1948

Mar 1950

VR343 (RAF), MA-7/ND-A, Crash at Beauvechain 21 Mar 1950

 

De Havilland DH98 Mosquito FB.6/TT.6

Twin-engined fighter-bomber and target towing aircraft

 

As the Belgian Air Force was quite satisfied with the use of the De Havilland Mosquito as a target towing aircraft the Belgian authorities decided to acquire three supplementary aircraft of this type. The Mosquito FB.VI, a ground attack aircraft modified by Fairey at Ringway (U.K.) for target towing thus becoming a Mosquito TT.6), was selected. The last of these Mosquito was retired from service with the Belgian Air Force in mid-1956 as the target towing missions were flown by the fighter units themselves or by the Meteor F.8 equipped 25° Squadron.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

MC-1

-

Mar 1954

Jul 1954

TE614 (RAF), MC-1/B2-G, w/o in accident at Koksijde on 4 Jun 1954

MC-2

-

Mar 1954

Aug 1956

TE663 (RAF), MC-2/B2-H

MC-3

-

Mar 1954

Aug 1956

TE771 (RAF), MC-3/B2-J

NS857

-

Jun 1945

-

NS857/5265M (RAF), transferred to Belgium and possibly used as instructional airframe at Wevelgem.

 

De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito NF.17 & 19

Twin-engined night-fighter

With the introduction of the De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito NF.30 night-fighter in squadron service the need arose to have some instructional airframes to train ground personnel at the Technical School at Tongeren. For this purpose a Mosquito NF.17 and NF.19 were acquired from RAF stocks.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

-

-

Jul 1947

1952

 Type NF.17, HK327/6343M (RAF), Technical School Tongeren as instr. airframe.

-

-

Jul 1947

1952

Type NF.19, MM631/6157M (RAF), Technical School Tongeren as instr. airframe.

 

Hawker Typhoon IB

Single engine ground attack aircraft

A single Hawker Typhoon was used after WWII as instructional airframe at the Technical School of Saffraanberg and later on at Tongeren. In June 1952 after the reconstruction of the School at Saffraanberg this very rare aircraft and a Hawker Hurricane were offered as museum exhibit at the Royal Army Museum at Brussels. Unbelievably only the Hurricane was accepted by the museum authorities. This is more than a missed opportunity as only one complete Hawker Typhoon remains in the world today.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

RB286

-

1946

1954

RB286 (RAF), Technical School Saffraanberg, Technical School Tongeren, scrapped

 

Miles Master II

Miles Master II at the Belgian Air Force Technical School at Saffraanberg in 1946.

Single engine two seat training aircraft.

 

 

  A single Miles Master II was used as instructional airframe at the Technical School of Saffraanberg as of February 1946. Most probably this aircraft was destroyed in the devastating fire at the school on August 8th, 1948. This instructional airframe was likely scrapped as it did not reappear on the inventory at Tongeren where the School found a temporarily refuge. The machine was previously used at the RAF (Belgian) Training School at Snailwell (U.K.).

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

DM387

-

Feb 1946

Aug 1948

RAF (Belgian) Training School, Snailwell (U.K.), "M", Technical School Saffraanberg.

Miles M.17 Monarch 

 

Single engine tourism aircraft.

 

 

  Miles M.17 Monarch OO-UMK (cn 787) was owned since 1938 by Mr. Camille Gutt. At the outbreak of the war the machine escaped to the U.K. to be used by Philips & Powis Aircraft. In 1944 it was transferred to the Belgian Section of the Metropolitan Communications Squadron where it became TP819. After a short spell at the Technical School of Saffraanberg, the Monarch was returned for civil use in 1947 and had a series of owners before it crashed at Sint Denijs Westrem near Gent on 21 November 1960.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

TP819

787

Sep 1946

Feb 1947

OO-UMK, U-0226, G-AGFW, TP819 (RAF), TP819 (Saffraanberg, Belgium), OO-UMK, Destroyed in an accident at St Denijs Westrem on Movember 21st, 1960.

 

Miles M.25 Martinet TT.1

Single engine two-seat target towing aircraft.

   Originally 9 Miles Martinet target towing aircraft were ordered with Command paper 7039 for use at the Fighter School (Jachtvliegschool/Ecole de Chasse) at Koksijde airbase. All of these aircraft were delivered in 1947. Two of the aircraft were in such a bad shape that they were refused by the Belgian authorities and replaced by two other aircraft. At first the aircraft resorted under the still mysterious "Flight 600" which officially did not exist on paper but which was in fact the name of the unit which gathered all available aircraft at the early days of the creation of the Fighter School. They soldiered on until replaced by Mosquito target towing aircraft in the early fifties.

Serial

C/N

In

Out

History

R-1

-

Mar 1947

Oct 1951

MS856 (RAF), EMA01 (BAF), R-1, not repaired after Cat.3 accident on 22 Jun 1951, scrapped at Koksijde

R-2

-

Mar 1947

May 1953

MS815 (RAF), EMA02 (BAF), R-2

R-3

-

Jun 1947

1949

EM521 (RAF), R-3, 18 Jul 1949 ground collission with R-7, most probably not repaired

R-4

-

Jun 1947

Mar 1952

EM683 (RAF), R-4

R-5

-

Jun 1947

Aug 1948

HP415 (RAF), R-5, refused by Belgian authorities due to its bad state, returned to RAF (Signal School) and replaced by R-10.

R-6

-

Jun 1947

May 1952

NR297 (RAF), R-6

R-7

-

Jul 1947

Jan 1950

NR441 (RAF), R-7, 18 Jul 1949 ground collission with R-3, most probably not repaired

R-8

-

Jun 1947

Jun 1949

R442 (RAF), R-8, 02 Jun 1949 Cat. 5 accident at Adinkerke due to engine failure.

R-9

-

Jun 1947

Jul 1948

MS773 (RAF), R-9, refused by Belgian authorities due to its bad state, returned to RAF, replaced by R-11.

R-10

-

Jul 1948

May 1953

JN539 (RAF), R-10

R-11

-

Jul 1948

Apr 1952

NR650 (RAF), R11, 24 Apr 1952 Cat.5 accident at Koksijde due to engine failure.

 

 Piper L-21B Super Cub

Single engine two-seat glider tug.

  In 1975 the Belgian Air Force acquired six former Koninklijke Luchtmacht (Royal Netherlands Air Force) Piper L21B Super Cubs for use by the Belgian Air Cadets. Contrary to the gliders the Piper Cubs are not the property of the Air Cadets and are exclusively flown by Belgian Air Force personnel. The aircraft are the responsibility of MCVZ/CMVV (Militair Centrum Voor Zweefvliegen / Centre Militaire de Vol à Voile) based at Goetsenhoven and report to No 1 Wing Training at Beauvechain. During the active gliding periods the aircraft are mainly based at Bertrix and occasionally, but can also be deployed to other bases where no winch (used to get the gliders airborne) is available. In the early period of operation the Super Cubs were painted in camouflage with day glow nose, tail and wingtips, but later the aircraft got a white paint scheme with orange engine cowling, wings and vertical tail plane.
In 2000/2002 all the remaining Super Cubs received a major overhaul, during which brand new fuselage frames, new wings and more powerful 180 HP engines were fitted. In reality the L21B's were replaced by new Super Cubs, where only some parts of the old aircraft were transferred to the new fuselages. The "new" Super Cubs are easily identified by their rounded aft window compared to a square one on the earlier models.

Serial

Serial

C/N

C/N

In

In

Out

Out

History

History

R-1

LB-01 (1)

LB-01 (2)

-

18-3786

-

LB-02 (1)

18-3607

LB-02 (2)

-

LB-03 (1)

18-3842 

LB-03 (2)

-

Oct 1975

-

Oct 1975

-

Oct 1975

-

LB-04

18-3843

Oct 1975

-

Active

-

Active

-

Active

Nov 1977

54-2403, R-113 (KLu), LB-01

LB-01

54-2407, R-117 (KLu), LB-02

LB-02

51-2442, R-152 (KLu), LB-03

LB-03

54-2443, R-153 (KLu), LB-04, crash at Brustem on 04 Sep 1977,  fuselage to LB-06

LB-05 (1)

18-3844

Oct 1975

LB-05 (2)

-

-

LB-06 (1)

18-3864

Oct 1975

-

Active

54-2444, R-154 (KLu), LB-05

LB-05

-

54-2464, R-174 (KLu), LB-06, received fuselage of LB-04 after severely being damaged in storm at Zoersel on 9/10 Aug 1992.

LB-06 (2)

-

-

Jun 2009

LB-06, crash at Goetsenhoven on 03 Jun 2009.

54-2403, R-113 (KLu), LB-01

 

Stampe Renard SR-6

Single-seat single-engine aerobatic trainer aircraft

Specially developed for aerobatic training in 1949, the Stampe Renard SR-6 was a single seat biplane powered by a 185 hp Mathis G.7R engine. Having received the civilian registration OO-SRX the aircraft briefly wore Belgian Air Force roundels while the letter "X" of its civilian registration remained on the fuselage. Only one SR-6 was ever built.

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